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Zheng Guogu, Liao Yuan (Previously titled Age of the Empire), 2004– present; Video installation (16′31′′); Courtesy of the artist, Vitamin Creative Space and OCAT Shenzhen

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Liu Wei, Chen Haoyu (Colin Siyuan Chinnery), Propitiation, 2007, 2016; Mixed media; Courtesy the artist and OCAT Shenzhen

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Liu Wei, Chen Haoyu (Colin Siyuan Chinnery), Propitiation, 2007, 2016; Mixed media; Courtesy the artist and OCAT Shenzhen

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Exhibition hall

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Exhibition hall

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Exhibition hall

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Exhibition hall

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Reading area at the exhibition hall

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Liu Chuang, Untitled(Dancing Partner), 2010, Video, 5'15", Courtesy of the Artist

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Lin Yilin, Whose Land? Whose Art?, 2010, video, 50’. Courtesy of the artist

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Zhang Liaoyuan, 1 Square Meter, 2006, event, performance, installation. Courtesy of the artist

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Zheng Guogu, Liao Yuan (formerly known as The Age of Empire), 2004-present, video installation. Courtesy of the artist

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Cao Fei (SL avatar: China Tracy), RMB City: A Second Life City Planning, 2007-2011, video, 5’57’’. Courtesy of the artist and Vitamin Creative Space

Digging a Hole in China
2016.3.20 - 2016.6.26

Digging a Hole in China

Dates: March 20 - June 26, 2016

Venue: Exhibition Hall A, OCAT Shenzhen

Artists: Cao Fei, Colin Siyuan Chinnery, Li Jinghu, Lin Yilin, Liu Chuang, Liu Wei, Wang Jianwei, Xu Qu, Xu Tan, Zhang Liaoyuan, Zheng Guogu, Zhuang Hui

Curator: Venus Lau

Exhibition Design: Betty Ng @ Collective

Opening Reception: March 20, 2016, 5pm

Organizer: OCAT Shenzhen

Support: Shenzhen Overseas Chinese Town Corporation Ltd.

 

OCAT Shenzhen is proud to present the large-scale exhibition, “Digging a Hole in China,” on view from March 20 to June 26 in Exhibition Hall A. Featuring a range of works produced in contemporary China that bear a connection to land, the exhibition attempts to expose and analyze the discrepancies between this genre of work and “conventional” land art understood in the Western-centric art historical context, thereby probing the potential of “land”—as a cultural and political concept—in artistic practice.




Contact

HUANG Xun

huangxun@ocat.org.cn 

GUO Chenli

guochenli@ocat.org.cn